Hippy cows, Highlanders, Hairy cows - whatever you call them.

Highland Cattle
My experiences with Highlands has left me with a new appreciation for cattle. I was the one who never-ever wanted cows...just too messy. I'll stick to my horses! Then I purchased 3 bred Highland cows - just to keep the grass down. Well, when those calves were born, I found myself standing out in the pasture, gazing in wonder at these darling little beings. Some of the literature is rather biased toward Highlands (since it's written by the association), so in reality I must say that they still need vaccinations, they do need to eat and they can be a PITA. But, that's cows. Gallery pictures here

picture of Highland calf - Becky




Stories from the Farm
An Introduction to Highland Cattle
by Donna Higgins

My experience with Highlands has left me with a new appreciation for cattle. I was the one who never-ever wanted cows...just too messy. I'll stick to my horses! Then I purchased 3 bred Highland cows -- just to keep the grass down. Well, when those calves were born, I found myself standing out in the pasture, gazing in wonder at these darling little beings. Now I have 20 head. Some of the literature is rather biased toward Highlands (since it's written by the association), so in reality I must say that they still need vaccinations, they do need to eat and they can be a PITA. But, that's cows.

The Highland breed has lived for centuries in the roughest hill country of Northern Scotland. They were originally kept by small farmers and used to raise a calf and produce milk for the farm family. In 1884 the first herd book was established and Great Britain formed the Highland Cattle Society to preserve the breed. The Royal Family are members and Patrons of the Society and keep an exceptional herd of Highlands at Balmoral Castle in Scotland.

Two areas of Scotland produced slightly different types of Highland cattle: The west coast of northern Scotland with the black, smaller Kyloe and the remote Highlands of Scotland with the larger, reddish or blonde Highland. Also within the registry are white, yellow, silver and dun. Both of these types are regarded as one breed, the Highland.

Highland cattle do well in extreme winter conditions. They fair well during winters with knee deep snow and, upon occasion, below zero temperatures and cold blowing winds. The varied terrain and trees give them all the protection they need, although many times they will lie or stand in the open with a coating of snow on their backs. The same goes for the summers when 100 degree days are common. The cattle find a spot of shade in a grove of trees or stand in a creek or pond during the heat of the day, then graze at night. There’s nothing like watching the herd romp when the sun and temperature goes down – heads tossing, tails in the air, hair flowing in the breeze – you can’t help watching.

Many new to the Highland breed are drawn by their looks, the hardiness of the breed and the ease of calving. First time heifers rarely need assistance and the calves are healthy and hardy right from the start. Highlands also enjoy eating various species of brush and vines to aid in the maintenance of the field. They are docile for the most part and, with proper facilities, easy to vet and maintain.

There are lots of reasons for owning Highland Cattle, but be sure you have adequate acreage for them to roam. Remember, they love a good romp in the evening during the heat of summer, and I’ll bet watching them brings a smile to your face.






Highland cow/calf pair

Highland steer

Highland cow grazing